New Study Shows California Ranks #1 for ‘Worst Quality Of Life’

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Unless you are very rich or homeless, living in California has become the worst state in the union for overall quality of life, with New Jersey right behind it.

One of the measurements of the quality life, according to a study by U.S. News, was whether residents can even afford to have a roof over their heads.

By that standard, California is failing. The state with the best quality of life was North Dakota, followed by Minnesota and Wisconsin.

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The rankings considered two sets of metrics for each state:

1. Natural environment, comprising drinking-water quality, air quality, and pollution and industrial toxins.

2. Social environment, comprising community engagement, social support, and voter participation.

The study also judged states on their infrastructure, health care, education, economy, opportunity, fiscal responsibility and crime and corrections, and used these factors to determine the “Best State” overall.

California ranked last in urban air quality and 45th in “low pollution health risk.” It was 13th in drinking water quality. The state also found itself second-to-last in voter participation, 44th in community engagement and 38th in social support.

Despite its beaches, redwood trees and Hollywood glam, the state’s blemishes are often highlighted. Los Angeles consistently leads as the world’s most traffic-congested urban area and even its own citizens have tried to secede multiple times.

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As has been the case for some time, it costs 3 times as much to rent a UHaul from California to Texas as it does the reverse.

This, of course, is because California has so many people leaving that they have a shortage of trucks.

But it illustrates the bigger issue: Businesses and residents are fleeing the state, and have been in droves.

California as we know it is simply unsustainable. To correct California’s unsustainable course, the state requires informed citizens and leaders willing to tackle the state’s budget realities. It is not happening, and there is an even more liberal slate on this year’s California ballots.

Over the next several years, volatile revenues, disproportionate spending growth, mounting debts, and inadequate infrastructures present significant hurdles for the state and its citizens. All the while, California’s population will grow and age considerably, placing even greater strains on state resources.

Even worse, California’s citizens are not armed with sufficient information due to California’s notoriously low levels of transparency, public disclosure, and civic engagement.

Housing is the elephant in the room.

The California housing director says housing affordability problems are as bad as they’ve ever been in the state’s history.

“The facts on the ground for a typical California family are really as bad as they’ve ever been in the state’s history,” said Ben Metcalf, Director of the Department of Housing and Community Development.”

He goes on to say, “If there is good news in all this, these are, in some cases, problems that we have created through local and state policies. And because these are challenges that have been created through policies, we know we can fix them.”

But the California legislature just continues to make matters worse, with no ‘fixing’ in sight.

Education you ask?

When it comes to its high school graduation ranking, California ranks 3rd to last in the nation. Minority drop out rates exceed 60% in some Los Angeles high schools.

Of course, the Left’s only answer is more spending on a school system, which already features excessively high administrative costs and has been listed as one of the three worst states at training teachers.

Most would consider the state of the state’s education system to be in serious trouble—except the ruling Democrats in California.

As for highways?

California ranked 47th in the most recent of the Reason Foundation’s 20th Annual Highway Report on the Performance of State Highway Systems. Only Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Alaska have it worse.

Instead of fixing what exists, Brown Jr. is committing untold tens of billions to a high-speed rail system. A system that almost nobody outside a public employee union wants. Most would consider the state of the state’s highway system to be in serious trouble—except the ruling Democrats in California.

I was raised in California. I moved back 3 times. But over four years ago I moved to Texas, and I will never look back.

When I was a kid, it was a great place. But in recent years, it has become a bastion of socialism. It is unaffordable to live there, everything is micromanaged, and it is heading for bankruptcy.

Boy, I love Texas!



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