Kim Jong Un HUMILIATED! North Korea Accidentally Bombed Itself In Botched Missile Test!

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Kim Jong Un delivered a message to the US on New Year’s Day, during which the leader of the rogue regime said it’s “not a mere threat but a reality that I have a nuclear button on the desk in my office.”

Well North Korea appears to have accidentally sent a missile crashing down into a city during a test that went awry last April, a new open source intelligence report revealed Wednesday.

North Korea tested a new intermediate-range ballistic missile six times last year. The first three tests ended in failure, with one test sending a ballistic missile into a town not too far from the test site.

The full extent of the damage is unknown, but satellite images show clear differences between the immediate before and after pictures of the facility believed to have been hit by the failed missile.

North Korea conducted its third test of the previously-unseen Hwasong-12 IRBM, an impressive weapon that served as a stepping stone in the development of a longer-range missile able to range the U.S. mainland, on April 28, 2017.

The missile fell out of the sky over North Korean territory after its first-stage engines failed after about a minute of powered flight, The Diplomat reports, citing U.S. government sources with knowledge of the North’s weapons programs.

Relying on photographs released by North Korea during a concert held in July, Dave Schmerler, a geolocation specialist and research associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, and Ankit Panda, a foreign affairs expert and the senior editor at The Diplomat, were able to use satellite images to identify both the launch site and the impact point for the April 28 missile test.

North Korea’s first atomic test in 2006, aides to President George W. Bush began phoning foreign capitals to reassure allies startled by Pyongyang’s surprising feat. The test, aides said, had been mostly a failure: a botched, 1-kiloton cry for attention from a regime that had no warheads or reliable delivery systems and would never be allowed to obtain them.

“The current course that they are on is unacceptable,” State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said publicly at the time, “and the international community is going to act.”

A decade later, that confidence has all but evaporated. After a week in which Pyongyang successfully lobbed four intermediate-range missiles into the Sea of Japan, U.S. officials are no longer seeing North Korea’s weapons tests as amateurish, attention-grabbing provocations. Instead, they are viewed as evidence of a rapidly growing threat – and one that increasingly defies solution.

Over the past year, technological advances in North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs have dramatically raised the stakes in the years-long standoff between the United States and the reclusive communist regime, according to current and former U.S. officials and Korea experts. Pyongyang’s growing arsenal has rattled key U.S. allies and spurred efforts by all sides to develop new first-strike capabilities, increasing the risk that a simple mistake could trigger a devastating regional war, the analysts said.

The Trump administration has not ruled out direct talks with North Korea but the United States and its allies must be “prepared for the worst” if diplomacy fails, the deputy secretary of state said Tuesday.

​“Eventually, we don’t rule out the possibility of course of direct talks,” John L. Sullivan said during a meeting in Japan, Reuters reported.

“Our focus is on diplomacy to solve this problem that is presented by the DPRK. We must, however, with our allies, Japan and South Korea and elsewhere, be prepared for the worst, should diplomacy fail,” he said, referring to North Korea by its official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Sullivan’s comments come amid the backdrop of joint military exercises in the waters off the Korean peninsula between US and South Korean troops and a warning by a North Korean envoy that “nuclear war” may be imminent.

​“The situation on the Korean peninsula where the attention of the whole world is focused has reached the touch-and-go point and a nuclear war may break out any moment,” North Korea’s Deputy UN Ambassador Kim In Ryong told a UN General Assembly committee Monday.

The Trump administration’s top diplomats said they are still pursuing a diplomatic solution to the standoff with the reclusive regime.

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