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What Happens Now to Room 135 at the Mandalay Bay Hotel?

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Las Vegas is the type of city that will continue to attract people from all over the world despite the massacre that occurred during the Route 91 Harvest Festival. Americans are not the type of people who will let a terrorist make them afraid to live their lives.

I have been to Vegas many times and have no problem returning.  Las Vegas is one of the most secure places to visit. The hotels in Vegas employ a massive amount of security personnel. In addition, casinos use sophisticated surveillance technology and are on constant alert for criminal behavior.

Having said that, I’d be lying if I said I would book at the Mandalay Bay for my next getaway. It’s not that I would be afraid. I just wouldn’t want the constant reminder of the worst mass shooting in our history while I’m there. I am sure for a short time period, there will be an undercurrent of anxiety in Las Vegas. Frankly, I don’t know that people will be comfortable looking out their windows and imagining the terror and heartbreak those poor people went though.

(Bild Exclusive / Polaris) ///

Mandalay Bay is likely to face an uphill battle in attracting people to their hotel. For those who do, there is the question of the 32nd floor, and specifically room 135.

The suite where the Las Vegas shooter unleashed terror on concertgoers below is now a crime scene. The $500 per night suite is a 1,705 square foot corner room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay. What becomes of this room next?

H/T Business Insider

“Last Thursday, Stephen Paddock checked into a $500 suite at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas.

Now, the Mandalay Bay hotel is irrevocably linked to the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history, after Paddock opened fire on a crowd of 22,000 people at a music festival across the street from the 32nd-floor window of his hotel room.

He killed 58 people and wounded over 500, police say.

Often, sites of tragedies become an area of mourning and remembrance. However, the room where Paddock executed his killing spree is unlikely to become that.

“From my opinion, the room disappears,” Anthony Melchiorri, the host of Travel Channel’s “Hotel Impossible,” told Business Insider.

Melchiorri said that if he were running the hotel, he would reach out to victims and their families to see how he could best help them.

Then the room in question — which has been identified as Room 135 on the 32nd floor — would most likely no longer be available for guests to book. Melchiorri said he would go so far as to have the doors sealed up, removing any trace of the suite’s existence.

Deanna Ting, the hospitality editor at the travel-industry intelligence company Skift, agreed that the room would probably not be available to be booked — at least not for a very long time.

Beyond the room in question, both Ting and Melchiorri emphasized the importance of the Mandalay Bay reestablishing the hotel as a safe and secure space for guests.

Housekeeping staff members and other employees could be retrained on how to respond if they see something suspicious. Ting predicted that a visible security presence — such as metal detectors, X-ray machines, or armed guards — would flood Las Vegas hotels, at least in the short term.

Las Vegas hotels already have some of the best security in the country — Melchiorri said the city had “more security per square foot” than any other city in the US.

Debra DeShong, a representative for the Mandalay Bay’s parent company, MGM Resorts, told Business Insider in a statement that the company “works consistently with local and national law enforcement agencies to keep procedures at our resorts up to date” and was “always improving and evolving.”

However, for the Mandalay Bay and other hotels in Las Vegas to convince guests of their safety, drastic and visible changes are likely to be necessary.”

Of course, this isn’t the first building to face this question. Some places, like Sandy Hook Elementary School are demolished after events like this. The 6th Floor of the Texas Depository, where Lee Harvey Oswald took aim at JFK, has been turned into a museum. Hotel rooms where famous people have died, like Whitney Houston, have been remodeled and renumbered, and are still in use.  The Pulse Nightclub, the Orlando nightclub which was attacked in 2016, is slated to become a memorial/museum by 2020.

We will have to see what becomes of Room 135. Whether it is sealed off, remodeled, or turned into a memorial, it will be a long time before mention of the Mandalay Bay doesn’t bring us back to this horrific week in our nation’s history.

 

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