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JUST IN! Two Days After the Events In Charlottesville, Black Christian Leaders Set the Record Straight!

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White supremacists are vile, and everyone agrees, but so are Antifa and the BLM and there is a major effort to entirely eliminate those hate groups from the equation in Charlottesville.

The media is not even mentioning that they were there, throwing rocks and bottles and causing mayhem!

They are even blaming President Donald Trump and his administration with the deaths caused by an unhinged man who drove his car through the crowd.

Rev. Derek McCoy, executive vice president for the Center of Urban Renewal and Education, was among clergy members who said claims by liberals and mainstream media that Trump has fostered a spirit of racism, miss the point entirely.

“One thing you need to understand: You are saying that the president is the instigator, and I think that is absolutely wrong. No, it is not disingenuous,” said McCoy.

“The president made his comments and we are not standing up here to say that we are best friends with everything the president does, but he is in an office that we all respect … If we are looking about how we can move our country forward, we are trying to make sure that we do that collectively together.”

Activist Star Parker, who founded CURE, said Trump’s initial statement condemning violence on both ends of the political spectrum in Charlottesville was right on target

“I would like for us to finally address the ‘alt-right’ and the ‘alt-left’ — the instigators that continue this discussion that racism is so inherent in our society that they are going to look for it endlessly to then spark the tensions of the ‘alt-right.’ The ‘alt-right’ was sent underground. They have been emboldened because of the ‘alt-left,’” he said.

“We are either going to be biblical and free or we are going to be secular in status. That is the cultural war. There is no need in us denying that we are … in one,” Parker said. “It has been intensifying over time and now it is coming to a culmination that can drag each and every one of us into another civil war. We don’t want that, and the clergy will stand up and support the president in his effort to make sure that we have this discussion and we have it civilty.”

Some speakers said efforts to stifle free speech have come back to haunt America.

“We are saying, ‘You can only have one thought process and that is the only thing that can be allowed within the spectrum of our country.’ I think that is wrong,” McCoy said. “So you do have this ‘alt-left,’ ‘alt-right’ and these factions in society that are happening. But you gotta understand, debate is being shut down and debate is something that has always been on the foundational principles of America, where we can foster, flourish and grow together and learn from each other.”

William Allen, a professor of political philosophy at Michigan State University, said the factors at work behind the violence had nothing to do with Trump.

“I will say this about the repeated ascription of President Trump as the driver of hateful speech in our country: There are two things wrong with that view. The first thing wrong with it is, we are pretending to hide behind blaming President Trump for our failures,” he said.

Instead, he said, efforts to suppress unwelcome speech have increased. He noted the contrast between 2017 and 1977, when the American Civil Liberties Union defended the right of Nazi supporters to march through the heavily Jewish community of Skokie, Illinois.

“There was a time when we celebrated what we might call the ‘Skokie principle’: When the far right marched through Skokie, Illinois, the left defended their right to march and speak even hateful speech. We are no longer celebrating the ‘Skokie principle’ in our country,” Allen said. “We stopped celebrating the ‘Skokie principle’ long before Donald Trump announced his candidacy for the presidency.”

“If we have a problem, the problem is that we have lost our way. We have people that are wandering in the desert … who have lost their way,” Allen said. “It is not going to do you much good to blame Moses. You gotta ask, ‘Why have the people lost their way, where did they lose their faith and how can it be restored?’”

H/T Western Journalism

 

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Baron Von Kowenhoven

Baron was just a shy kid with a dream, growing up in the 40's with a knack for story-telling. After a brief career in film, Von Kowenhoven went to Europe in search of fringe-scientific discoveries and returned in the 90's to unleash them on the entertainment and political landscape of America.

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