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Here’s Everything Coming To Netflix In September

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September is nigh, which means so is the beginning of the school year, and a slight change in weather, depending on where you’re located.

But it also means that Netflix is about to undergo its monthly molting — soon, you’ll have a whole new set of movie and television titles to go with your pumpkin spice latte. Alternatively, you’ll have more fodder for back-to-school procrastination.

This month, Netflix has some whoppers. There’s the Academy Award-nominated Carol, as well as Disney’s Beauty & The Beast, and the classic film Jaws. The best of these classic film arrivals, in my personal opinion, is Dead Poets’ Society, the movie that made “O, Captain, My Captain” an iconic phrase.

This is also the month that Disney comes to Netflix — that means classics like Pocahontas, Hercules, and Mulan will soon be available for streaming.

The real wealth here, though, is in the September Netflix Originals. The crime drama Narcos returns for a third season September 1, and fans of BoJack Horseman can take on the fourth season September 8. Then, there’s a slew of brand-new ones: the satirical series American Vandal, an autobiographical series from the comedian Jack Whitehall, and a new animated series from The League’s Nick Kroll, among others.

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Robin Williams plays an inspiring professor in this Oscar-nominated film also starring Ethan Hawke.

Available September 1

Deep Blue Sea (1999)

Just in time for Shark Week — Samuel L. Jackson stars in this film about researchers terrorized by a shark in the open water.

Available September 1

Disney’s Hercules (1997)

You know the tale: He went from a zero to a hero. Just like that.

Available September 1

Disney's Hercules (1997) You know the tale: He went from a zero to a hero. Just like that. Available September 1

High Risk (1981)

Josh Brolin stars in this caper about a group of men who decide to raid the warehouse of a notorious drug dealer.

Available September 1

And of course: Jaws (1975) (Along with Jaws II (1978), Jaws III (1983) and Jaws: The Revenge (1987)

Meet the movie that made sharks into cold-blooded killers.

Available September 1

See the rest of the list at Refinery.com

Netflix, Amazon and other streaming services have the Satellite and Cable Industry on ‘Death Watch’!

Video killed the radio star and the internet is killing broadcast television.

Millions are getting rid of high prices and endless commercials and trading them in for endless choices via online entertainment like Amazon, Netflix, Hulu and a number of other on-demand venues.

Cable and satellite lost a net 566,000 subscribers last quarter, the second biggest drop in pay TV customers in history. They lost almost a million in the last six months.

Over the last few years, millions have eliminated the expensive cable and satellite bill, the zillions of channels they never watch, the 20 minutes per hour of commercials, and the inconvenience of having to watch what they decide you get to watch and when.

They are either buying smart TV’s or hooking PC’s, ROKU boxes, and other devices to the television and watching all kinds of streaming content. They are watching what they want, when they want, commercial free, for pennies on the dollar for the price of regular broadcast TV.

Netflix averages $10 a month. Amazon Prime costs $99 a year, but comes with the bonus of discounts and shipping savings + on Amazon purchases and pays for itself quickly.

Gotta love that Netflix!

The networks all broadcast their shows via their websites. YouTube, and a number of other online video sources also have movies and television available. The major sports leagues also have access to sporting events, however there is often a further small charge.

 

 

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About Author

Baron Von Kowenhoven

Baron was just a shy kid with a dream, growing up in the 40's with a knack for story-telling. After a brief career in film, Von Kowenhoven went to Europe in search of fringe-scientific discoveries and returned in the 90's to unleash them on the entertainment and political landscape of America.

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