Billionaires Against Trump Now For Trump:

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Donald Trump is no longer self-funding his campaign and has begun accepting big money donations, some of which are coming from what was his opposition.

Much of the billionaire’s success in the primary race came from his ability to fund his own campaign and tell voters that he is not beholden to corporate, Wall Street or lobbyists’ interests.

But now going up against the Clinton War Machine, his own wealth and small-donor contributions would fall very short.

Donald Trump is no longer self-funding his campaign and has begun accepting big money donations, some of which are coming from what was his opposition.

Last week, Billionaire Republican donor Sheldon Adelson pledged to give Donald Trump as much as $100 million, a record-setting amount for the Nevada casino magnate.

Adelson had previously been a vocal supporter of Marco Rubio, causing consternation from Donald Trump via one of his famous Tweets:

The latest big-money contributor to the new pro-Trump Great America PAC is Texas oil tycoon T. Boone Pickens.

Pickens was on record in support of Bush, Carson and Fiorina and had been vocal in his opposition of Trump:

“We’ve turned our presidential selection process into a reality TV show,” Pickens complained refering to Trump the “Apprentice” show star.

The NYT reports on a number of other billionaires who have moved their support to Trump:

“Broadcasting mogul Stanley Hubbard is also aboard the Trump bandwagon. He had previously written checks to the anti-Trump Our Principles PAC.

Other wealthy donors joining Team Trump are banking billionaire Andy Beal, California hotel owner Kelly Roberts and Ali Janagiri of EB5 investors.

The goal is to raise $25 million before the GOP national convention in July and $150 million for the general election, said PAC co-chairman Eric Beach.

“We’re rocking and rolling,” said Beach, noting the pro-Trump group now has 30,000 contributors.”

Trump has previously derided his GOP rivals for depending on large super PAC donations from “special interests” and claimed he would be beholden to no one.

Trump has previously derided his GOP rivals for depending on large super PAC donations from “special interests” and claimed he would be beholden to no one.

Trump convention manager, Paul Manafort told conservative radio host Laura Ingraham last month, “That’s very important for him to say now in his mind because he wants people to know that he owes nobody anything other than the American people, or the voters who are picking, choosing his candidacy.”

How much can he raise is now the question. he has to beat the power of the Clinton Political machine which has endless pockets.

 

 

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Baron Von Kowenhoven

Baron was just a shy kid with a dream, growing up in the 40's with a knack for story-telling. After a brief career in film, Von Kowenhoven went to Europe in search of fringe-scientific discoveries and returned in the 90's to unleash them on the entertainment and political landscape of America.

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