Southern States Huddle Up for Early ‘SEC’ Presidential Primary

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Playing on the name of the popular NCAA conference known around the country for its solidly competitive football programs, Georgia Secretary of State Bryan Kemp has plans to make the South known for something else: an early Presidential primary.

Georgia Secretary of State Bryan Kemp wants to create an SEC Primary to give southern states more clout in presidential primary selection contests.

Georgia Secretary of State Bryan Kemp wants to create an SEC Primary to give southern states more clout in presidential primary selection contests.

Kemp says that Southern voters are often overlooked in Presidential primaries and he’d like for Georgians and other voters in the region to have the opportunity to make a difference in the 2016 President primary season.

Kemp wants Southern voters to be able to exercise more influence in Presidential primaries, to have a louder voice in the country’s ‘locker room’ when candidates are selected.

The South may appear to be ‘solid’ again just as it once was… However, this time the South may be ‘solid’ in a different party, the GOP. Once known as the ‘solid South’, southern voters, who are traditionally more conservative, brought much needed common sense to the country’s political spectrum. They moderated the liberal vote in other states in both primaries of the national political parties, but mainly the Democrat party. Now, with Democrats having recently failed to garner a statewide victory in many southern states, it appears that republican candidates appealing to southern voters would benefit most from an ‘SEC primary.’

Speaking of the strategy, “The last time a group of Southern politicians tried to do that, Chuck Robb, Al Gore and Bill Clinton created the Southern primary in the early 1980s to try to make Democrats a more mainstream party,” Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee told the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “Now those offices are held by Republicans and you find Republicans are going to try to have a Southern primary to assert themselves.”

And how would the creation of such a primary affect other states who have traditionally ‘huddled’ in this corner of national politics? Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina would still carry the ball, but elections officials in Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas all want in the game. So do election officials in Oklahoma and Virginia, though they aren’t home to SEC schools. Florida reports that it may kickoff its primary even sooner than the others.

Folks, it’s clear that for states hoping to have more clout in the primaries one thing is for certain: the early bird will get the worm.

About Author

Leland Ivy

Leland Ivy grew up in Georgia and Tennessee. He has worked for several members of Congress and most recently worked in 2014 to take back a Southern California Congressional District. Leland has a variety of interests including running, CrossFit, lifting weights, and flying private airplanes.

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