Colo. High School Students Now Pledge In Arabic: ‘One Nation Under Allah’

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allahstatueTom Lopez, a Colorado High School Principal is okay with “Under God” being removed and students saying “One Nation Under Allah” in the pledge of allegiance. One question for the Principal, educators, parents and everyone else in the Rocky Mountain State: Are you high?

The principal at Rocky Mountain High School in Fort Collins, Colorado, is facing a hailstorm of criticism from some very angry parents and residents.

The school recites the Pledge of Allegiance weekly and last Monday, a member of their “Cultural Arms Club” led the student body in an Arabic version of the pledge, replacing the words “under God” with “under Allah.”

Principal Lopez denies any attempt to push an Islamic agenda, saying, “These students love this country. They were not being un-American in trying to do this. They believed they were accentuating the meaning of the words as spoken regularly in English.” Lopez doesn’t make any sense. Speaking unintelligible words in Arabic in some way accentuates their meaning? That is an extremely weak argument in defense of an ill-advised decision.

He said the cultural clubs seeks to “destroy the barriers, embrace the cultures” that exist within the high school. That would translate into “destroy the barriers to Islam and embrace it,” correct, Mr. Lopez?

The Poudre School District communications director, Danielle Clark, said they understand why parents are upset. She told Fox News, “We understand not everybody would agree with the students’ choice. We’ve heard there are some who are upset.”

Let’s put his into perspective for the feeble-minded Clark and Lopez. It is not the student’s choice. They do not control the public address system. It was a school choice.

Her simplistic defense included a reference to “one” supportive email and a reference to a similar mistake last year which drew controversy when the pledge was recited in Spanish. Somehow not learning from and expanding upon your previous mistakes is perceived as a viable defense for these educators.

An abdication of responsibility is also part of their defense. Clark attempted to pass the buck of responsibility to the students, saying, “This is a student-initiated and student-led club. There is no school sponsor or advisor. It doesn’t come under the umbrella of the district.”

Actually, the activity of reciting the pledge does come under the district. Choosing to put it into the hands of a group not regulated by their administrators does not provide absolution. “We deferred to the students because it’s their deal,” she said.


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