Oklahoma Gov. Fallin reaffirms support of Common Core by issuing executive order

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OKLAHOMA CITY – Republican leaders in Indiana recently said Common Core has become so politically toxic that it’s nearly as unpopular with voters as the new health care law.

FallinOklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, a Republican, apparently doesn’t agree.

On Wednesday, Fallin issued an executive order reaffirming her support of the new, nationalized learning standards, reports the Associated Press.

Fallin’s executive order “states the federal government will have no input in the formulation of the standards and that the state will be responsible for deciding how to test student performance,” the AP reports.

While that might soothe the fears of some critics, it does nothing to alleviate the concerns of others who believe Common Core is designed to impose a kind of academic socialism upon the nation’s 13,000 school districts, bringing them to the same, mediocre level.

Fallin’s support of the homogenized learning standards isn’t surprising, considering she recently became the chairwoman of the National Governors Association, one of the two private organizations that holds the copyright to the Common Core learning standards. (The Council of Chief State School Officers is the other organization.)

Steve Dickson of the Oklahoma City Conservative Examiner notes the governor’s unwavering support of Common Core puts her directly at odds with many Oklahoma GOP activists. That could be a real problem for Fallin when she seeks reelection next November.

“It remains to be seen if this will add to the momentum building for a primary challenge to Governor Fallin,” Dickson writes. “Rumors have recently circulated that former State Sen. Randy Brogdon is considering just such an effort. In 2010, Fallin won the GOP Primary 136,477 to 98,170. Considering the giant fundraising advantage ($2,765,635.66 for Fallin to Brogdon at $437,642.24) in that election, a well- funded challenge would have a legitimate chance of making up the 38,307 voter gap.

Dickson concludes Fallin executive order “will certainly not do anything to quell the rising discontent from the activist base of the party.”

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