Still no discipline for teacher who posted video of distraught special education student

0

UTICA, N.Y. – Swift action is taken against students who posted video of teachers online. The same obviously can’t be said of the opposite scenario.

warped-clockA couple months ago, Utica, New York special education teacher Mark Turnpenny posted a video of one of his students crying over his apparent inability to take a standardized test.

Turnpenny was attempting to use the child as an example for his disapproval of mandated tests.

But his example boomeranged and he received a sharp rebuke from parents and the media.

He clearly deserved a tongue-lashing, at the very least, for humiliating this child in public. And the school district gave the distinct impression that action would be taken.

One district official told the media that the incident was under investigation, and “appropriate action will be taken at the conclusion of the investigation.”

But the school district has offered nothing in the form of reprimand or punishment.

“The Utica City School District school board has yet to take action nearly two months after a tenured teacher posted video on his Facebook page of a distraught student taking a state exam,” reports the Utica Observer-Dispatch.

An attorney for the district told the newspaper he didn’t know if the board would take any action.

The superintendent provided the classic cop out by saying he couldn’t discuss it because it was a “personnel matter.”

The newspaper notes, “Because Turnpenny is tenured, the district would have to take legal action before it could take any type of employment action.”

In other words, the district would have to drop potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees for even a chance to dump this guy.

A student is betrayed and humiliated by his insensitive special education teacher (you know, one of the teachers who are supposed to be the most sensitive) and nothing is done about it, mostly because the teacher has a double-layer of protective armor – union membership and tenure.

Isn’t the union-controlled government education system grand?

By Kyle Olson at EAGnews.org

Send this to friend